Movies and Video Games — Why They Don’t Mix

August 31, 2008

Recently the difference between the silver screen and the numerous thirty-inchers hooked up to gaming platforms, dotting bedroom’s across the globe has been merged. But has it been abused?

Adam Elkus wrote a piece that I recently discovered, titled Game Over, Curtains Close, which gives an interesting analysis toward why video-game adapted movies have always been worse than their predecessor. He lets in the common argument from disappointed gaming fans: that the cast of the movie, its director, and its plot pails to compare to the superiority of the original game.

But this is contradicted entirely with the case of Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, which was written, directed, produced, and scored by the exact same people who made the original game. Consequently, the movie was a complete flop — going straight to DVD. 

So what really is the difference between video games and movies that is so large, yet undiscoverable? Elkus argues that because video games are active and movies are not, watching a video-game based movie would ultimately be a direct contrast to watching your friend play video games over his back for two hours. 

Although I do believe this is true, I think there’s more to the argument than that. In truth, a movie may be different morally than a video game, the audience is a big factor. Movie-goers are simply different people with different tastes than gamers, and that carries out to the theaters. And no matter how original the remake may be, it simply will fail because no one watching it will enjoy. 

And because a movie is the opposite of a game, a gaming movie will never succeed in the box office. Simple as that.

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2 Responses to “Movies and Video Games — Why They Don’t Mix”


  1. I think that when playing a video game, like reading a book, you fill in the missing details in your head and have a unique perspective on the story. When the movie is made, it can be difficult for people to agree with the perspective chosen by the filmmakers. Since most video game movies are marketed directly toward the people who play it (whereas book adaptations are generally marked to the public at large), a far greater portion of the audience will disagree with the interpretation. And the niche targeting probably keeps the studio from putting much effort into the production, knowing there’s a limit to their earning potential.

  2. pacer521 Says:

    very good point — another interesting perspective.


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